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The Myth of the "Best" Diet: Embracing Real Food.

In the world of health and fitness, the quest for the "best" diet is an ongoing pursuit. As women, we often find ourselves bombarded with conflicting information, leaving us wondering which path to follow and overwhelmed at all of the conflicting information. Let's explore the myth of the perfect diet and shed light on why focusing on real, whole foods and staying hydrated may be the key to achieving lasting wellness.


The Illusion of the "Perfect" Diet: Various diets claim to be the ultimate solution for women's health, from keto to paleo, and everything in between. However, the reality is that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to nutrition. Bodies differ, lifestyles vary, and individual needs fluctuate.


Have you heard of or tried any of these?

  1. Atkins Diet: Low-carbohydrate diet that emphasizes protein and fats, with different phases for gradual carb reintroduction.

  2. Weight Watchers (WW): Focuses on a point system for managing portion control and overall calorie intake.

  3. South Beach Diet: Emphasizes high-fiber, low-glycemic index foods for weight loss and improved health.

  4. Raw Food Diet: Involves consuming unprocessed and uncooked foods, often plant-based.

  5. Alkaline Diet: Advocates for consuming alkaline-forming foods to maintain a balanced pH level in the body.

  6. Detox Diet: A short-term diet that aims to eliminate toxins from the body, often through specific foods or juice cleanses.

  7. Cabbage Soup Diet: A low-calorie, short-term diet centered around cabbage soup, lacking in variety and essential nutrients.

  8. The Grapefruit Diet: Involves consuming large amounts of grapefruit with each meal, lacking variety and long-term sustainability.


How is that working for you?


Is it feasible to stay on this roller coaster ride indefinitely? Diet, no diet. Lose weight, gain weight?


If the response is NO, why do you persist?


Are you open to a more logical approach?

What if I had an approach that does not have a name BUT will help you form lasting habits for life!


Michael Pollan says it best. 'Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.'


Bottom line, eat real, whole food, as much as you can because the kinds of food you eat can make a big difference.


In a recent study, NIH researchers admitted 20 adults to a metabolic ward, where the participants stayed for the duration of the trial. (This way, the scientists could measure every calorie the volunteers ate and burned.) 


Each participant was randomly assigned to a diet of ultra-processed foods or minimally-processed foods. They were allowed to consume as much or as little as desired. 


After two weeks, they switched and did the alternative diet for two weeks.


The result: Participants ate 508 more calories per day and gained weight on the ultra-processed diet. They lost weight on the minimally-processed diet.

 

Make no mistake: Switching from eating a lot of ultra-processed foods to all minimally-processed foods isn’t easy to do overnight.

But the good news: Unless you sign up for a study, you don’t need to do it overnight. 


Instead, start by adding more minimally-processed foods—such as vegetables, fruit, legumes, 100 percent whole grains, or lean protein—and don’t worry about cutting out or “subtracting” ultra-processed foods. 


This “add first” strategy can be highly effective at “crowding out” the ultra-processed foods that are so easy to overeat. 


That’s because, as this study suggests, minimally-processed foods are more filling and satisfying, which can help reduce your calorie intake naturally. 


As a coach, I can able to help.”

I can meet you where you are and teach you how to make small changes, done consistently over time to get the results you need!


PMID: 33027677


Hall KD, Ayuketah A, Brychta R, Cai H, Cassimatis T, Chen KY, et al. Ultra-Processed Diets Cause Excess Calorie Intake and Weight Gain: An Inpatient Randomized Controlled Trial of Ad Libitum Food Intake. Cell Metab. 2019 Jul 2;30(1):67–77.e3. 


Image file name: UltravsMinimal.png

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